CLIMATE CHANGE CONNECTION NEWS

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Transition Winnipeg has released Winnipeg’s Great Transition: Ideas and Actions for a Climate-Resilient, Low-Carbon Future. This document and website highlights how the increasing frequency and intensity of precipitation, flooding, and storm events is taxing city infrastructure and the solvency of government - and sets out a well-structured plan to build a low-carbon, resilient future.

 

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CLIMATE CHANGE CONNECTION NEWS
 

Updated: Tue Sep 2     1:44 PM CDT

   
 

Students to vote on U-Pass in 2014 fall referendum

Sep 2, 2014 - Manitoban

WINNIPEG - Members of UMSU and University of Winnipeg Students’ Association (UWSA) will vote this upcoming fall term on the universal bus pass (U-Pass) that could give post-secondary students access to more affordable transportation at reduced rates starting in the fall 2015 term.

 

Widespread flooding as storm swamps city

Aug 22, 2014 - Winnipeg Free Press

WINNIPEG - Torrential downpours Thursday night caused the cancellation several events, flooded buildings, washed out roads and trapped drivers in flash floods. Environment Canada received reports from 25 mm to 50 mm of rain throughout the city.

 
 

At least 36 dead, 7 missing in landslides in Hiroshima in western Japan

Aug 20, 2014 - Associated Press

TOKYO - Rain-sodden slopes collapsed in torrents of mud, rock and debris Wednesday on the outskirts of Hiroshima city, killing at least 36 people and leaving seven missing, Japanese police said.

 

Why in ‘remote, cold corners’ of the world, melting ground is giving way

Aug 20, 2014 - PBS

When holes opened up in the earth recently in Siberia, a wave of speculation was set off as to their cause. Scientists are now pinpointing a dramatic increase in arctic thawing, which may have released methane once trapped below the frozen ground. For a better understanding, Judy Woodruff talks to Tom Wagner of NASA.